THE LATEST ON THE AFRICAN PRESENCE IN SOUTH AMERICA – THE AFRICAN CRANIAL-FACIAL FEATURED “LUZIA – THE SOUTH AMERICAN “LUCY” (AFRICAN “AUSTRALOPITHECUS AFARENSUS”)

THE LATEST ON THE AFRICAN PRESENCE IN SOUTH AMERICA:
Luzia Woman:
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Luzia Woman (Portuguese pronunciation: [luˈzi.ɐ]) is the name for an Upper Paleolithic period skeleton of a Paleo-Indian woman who was found in a cave in Brazil. Some archaeologists believe the young woman may have been part of the first wave of immigrants to South America. Nicknamed Luzia (her name pays homage to the famous African fossil “Lucy”, who lived 3.2 million years ago), the 11,500-year-old skeleton was found in Lapa Vermelha, Brazil, in 1975 by archaeologist Annette Laming-Emperaire.[1]

Computerized reconstruction of Luzia’s face. Skin color and hair features are suppositions.
Contents
[hide]
• 1 Discovery
• 2 Phenotypical analysis
• 3 Anthropometry
• 4 See also
• 5 References
Discovery[edit]
Luzia was originally discovered in 1975 in a rock shelter by a joint French-Brazilian expedition that was working not far from Belo Horizonte, Brazil. The remains were not articulated. The skull, which was separated from the rest of the skeleton but was in surprisingly good condition, was buried under more than forty feet of mineral deposits and debris.
There were no other human remains at the site. New dating of the bones announced in 2013 confirmed that at an age of 10,030 ± 60 14C yr BP(11,243–11,710 cal BP). Luzia is one of the most ancient American human skeletons ever discovered.[2] Forensics have determined that Luzia died in her early 20s. Although flint tools were found nearby, hers are the only human remains in Vermelha Cave.
Phenotypical analysis[edit]

A cast of Luzia’s skull at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History.
Her facial features include a narrow, oval cranium, projecting face and pronounced chin, strikingly dissimilar to most native Americans and their indigenous Siberian forebears. Anthropologists have variously described Luzia’s features as resembling those of Negroids, Indigenous Australians, Melanesians and the Negritos of Southeast Asia. Walter Neves, an anthropologist at the University of São Paulo, suggests that Luzia’s features most strongly resemble those of Australian Aboriginal peoples. Richard Neave of Manchester University, who undertook a facial reconstruction of Luzia described it as negroid.[3]
Neves and other Brazilian anthropologists have theorized that Luzia’s Paleo-Indian predecessors lived in South East Asia for tens of thousands of years, after migrating from Africa, and began arriving in the New World, as early as 15,000 years ago. The oldest confirmed date for an archaeosite in the Americas is 14,800 cal years BP, for the Monte Verde site in southern Chile. Some anthropologists have hypothesized that an Australoid population from coastal east Asia migrated in boats along the Kuril island chain, the Beringian coast, and down the west coast of the Americas during the decline of the Last Glacial Maximum.[4][5]
Neves’ conclusions have been challenged…” by white racist Eurocentrists and others who deny that Luzia is Negroid and instead wish to theorize her as being non-African, and instead an ancester of South American Indians who migrated from North America to Central and South America!

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About Harold L Carter

Bachelor of Science, Columbia University Masters degree, Ohio State University Undergraduate National Officer, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Eastern Asst Vice President, when a student at Columbia University Profile Photograph: Mom & Me, when I was a graduate student
This entry was posted in AFRICAN HISTORY, AFRICAN PRESENCE IN SOUTH AMERICA, AFRICAN PRESENCE IN THE AMERICAS, AUTHENTIC WORLD HISTORY AND HUMAN BIOLOGICAL AND CULTURAL HISTORY, HISTORY OF PEOPLE OF AFRICAN DESCENT, HUMAN HISTORY FROM PREHISTORIC TIMES AND THE EARLIEST CIVILIZATIONS TO THE 21ST CENTURY, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

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