THE “AUTHENTIC WORLD HISTORY” VERSION OF THE AFRICAN ORIGIN OF AGRICULTURE

 

 

EPI-PALAEOLITHIC:

The Encyclopedia Wikipedia described “Epipalaeolithic hunter-gathers” as having made relatively advanced tools from small flint or obsidian blades, known as microliths s that were hafted in wooden implements.

Howeve, further and more accurate research findings indicated that the Epi-Palaeolithic extended as far back as 1.8 million years ago in Ancient Egypt in Africa during which tools such as hand axes and other Acheulian tools were made by the prehistoric/pre-dynastic ancient Egyptians.

 Also in regards to the origin of agriculture, it occurred in Africa – 18,000 Years Ago not about 10,000 to 7,000 years ago in Eurasia (Europe).Blacks in Science:  Ancient and Modern, Edited by Ivan Van Sertima, “An Ancient Harvest in the Nile,” by Fred Wendorf, Romuald Schild, and Angela E Close, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Science, November, 1982.

It was discovered that between 18,000 and 17,000 years ago while ice still covered much of Eurasia (Europe) African people were already raising crops of wheat, barley, lentils, chick peas, capers and dates.  [Fred Wendorf, Romuald Schild, and Angela E Close, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Science, November, 1982.

Acheulian Handaxes – (Acheulian – 1,800,000 – 200,000 B.C.

In Africa during the Old Palaeolithic about 1,800 000 – 200 000 years ago tools made by African people were typically large bifacially flaked handaxes, picks and cleavers. 

These Acheulian tools were being made by African people 1.8 million – 200,000 years ago.  The Old Palaeolithic was 1,800 000 – 200 000 years ago.

“In Eurasia (Europe) the Scandinavian Ice Sheet itself had started to retreat northward about 8300 years ago  and the period between then and the origins of agriculture (occurred at various times in the 7th to 4th millennia (7000 – 6000 – 4000 – 3000 years ago), depending on location) and was one of great environmental and cultural changes in Eurasia (Europe). 

Mesolithic:

Eurocentrists defined “Epipaleolithic” as a term used for the “final Upper Palaeolithic industries occurring at the end of the final glaciationwhich appear to merge technologically into the Mesolithic“.[1]

The following was indicated in the Encyclopedia Wikipedia with regard to definitions of Epipalaeolithic and Mesolithic:

“The term Epipaleolithi is sometimes used as a synonym of “Mesolithic“. When a distinction is made, “Epipaleolithic” stresses the continuity with the Upper Paleolithic, while “Mesolithic” stresses the subsequent transition to the Neolithic. [2] Alfonso Moure says in this respect:

‘In the language of Prehistorical Archaeology, the most extended trend is to use the term “Epipaleolithic” for the industrial complexes of the post-glacial hunter-gatherer groups. Inversely, those that are in transitional ways towards artificial production of food are inscribed in the “Mesolithic’.[3]

Epipalaeolithic hunter-gatherers (in Eurasia (Europe) were said to have made relatively advanced tools from small flint or obsidian blades, known as microliths that were hafted in wooden implements and that “they were generally nomadic.”

It was stated:

“Some authors in Wikipedia:avoid weasel words reserve the term “Mesolithic” for the cultures of Europe, where the extinction of the Megafauna had a great impact on the Paleolithic populations at the end of the Ice Age, from about 8000 BCE until the advent of the Neolithic (Sauveterrian, Tardenoisian, Maglemosian, etc.)..

With the following references:

 

[1]    Bahn, Paul, The PenguinArchaeological Guide, Penguin, London, pp. 141. ISBN 0-14-051448-1

[2]    “The Scandinavian Ice Sheet itself started to retreat northward about 8300 bce, and the period between then and the origins of agriculture (at various times in the 7th to 4th millennia, depending on location) was one of great environmental and cultural change. It is termed the

Mesolithic Period (Middle Stone Age) to emphasize its transitional importance, but the alternative term Epipaleolithic, used mostly in eastern Europe, stresses the continuity with processes begun earlier.” history of Europe (http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/195896/ history-of-Europe/58234/ Mesolithic-adaptations)  Encyclopedia Britannica online (accessed April 2013) and

[3]    A. Moure El Origen del Hombre, 1999. ISBN 84-7679-127-5  and

[4]          


“Article Sources and Contributors

 

Epipaleolithic  Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=555449027  Contributors: Adamsan, Antandrus, Anthonyhcole, Archaeodontosaurus, Archaeogenetics, Arkuat, Bcasterline, Bernorix, Casito, Cattus, Chrisdab, Conversion script, Dbachmann, Dmitri Lytov, Dougweller, Emperorbma, Finn Bjørklid, Floris V, Glenn, Hagedis, Hairy Dude, Hibernian, Joy, Kalogeropoulos, Koro Neil, Law soma, Leonard G., Magioladitis, Mana Excalibur, Micke-sv, Million Moments, Nagelfar, OsamaBinLogin, PatHadley, Paul Bedson, Penfold, PenguiN42, Phlebas, Quercus basaseachicensis, Raven rs, Salix alba, Skäpperöd, and Stevenmitchell, Sugaar, Tenofour, Tvdog, Yak, 8 anonymous edits”

 

 

 

 

 

 

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About Harold L Carter

Bachelor of Science, Columbia University Masters degree, Ohio State University Undergraduate National Officer, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Eastern Asst Vice President, when a student at Columbia University Profile Photograph: Mom & Me, when I was a graduate student
This entry was posted in "EUROCENTRISM" - "TEACHING MYTH AS HISTORY", "EUROPEANIZATION OF WORLD HISTORY, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

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